Ed Dunn comic

Why Are You Doing This?

Why Are You Doing This?

A moody twenty-something wallowing in depression after a breakup with his long-time girlfriend, finds himself drawn into a paranoid's worst nightmare after his best friend is murdered and the blame is pinned on him. With the help of a single mother who spontaneously throws in her lot with him (not to mention her precocious daughter), he sets out to clear his name. Soon new relationships are forged, dark secrets from the past are revealed, and the real killer comes back into the picture...with a vengeance. "Typically for a Jason book, Why Are You Doing This? builds to a gut-punch ending that attempts to answer the titular question. Why do people fall in love, chase each other, kill each other? Because this is a story, and stories need to be interesting." - "The Best Comics of the '00s," The A.V. Club

The Last Musketeer

The Last Musketeer

After his existential thriller (Why Are You Doing This?), his Parisian famous-writers crime caper (The Left Bank Gang), and his time-travel story (I Killed Adolf Hitler), Jason's fourth full-color album may feature his loopiest premise yet. Set in the present time, The Last Musketeer stars the by-now centuries old musketeer Athos, who has been reduced to a suavely dressed but useless near-panhandler trading on his now almost extinct fame. All this changes when one day the Martians attack Earth. Suddenly there is a need for swashes to be buckled, and Athos leaps back into the fray with a vengeance. The Last Musketeer is a vintage sci-fi adventure with a unique twist from an internationally acclaimed cartoonist.

Low Moon

Low Moon

Originally serialized in 2008 in the New York Times Sunday Magazine "Funny Pages" section, the title story of this collection might be the world's first (and likely last) chess western. Also included, "Emily Says Hello," is a typically deadpan Jason tale of murder, revenge and sexual domination. The wordless "&" tells two tales at once: one about a skinny guy trying to steal enough money to save his ill mother, and the other about a fat guy murderously trying to woo his true love. The two stories collide on the last page, in Jason's inimitable genre-mashing style. Also included, "Early Film Noir" can best be described as The Postman Always Rings Twice meets Groundhog Day. But starring cavemen. And finally, "You Are Here" features alien kidnappings, space travel, and the pain and confusion of family ties, culminating in an enigmatic finale that rivals Jason's greatest twists. This collection of new and previously unpublished work shows one of the world's most acclaimed graphic novelists at his funniest, wryest, and most poignant.

Hey, Wait...

Hey, Wait...

This superbly evocative graphic novella by the award-winning Norwegian cartoonist Jason (his first appearance in the English language) starts off as a melancholy childhood memoir and then, with a shocking twist midway through, becomes the summary of lives lived, wasted, and lost. Like Art Spiegelman did with Maus, Jason utilizes anthropomorphic stylizations to reach deeper, more general truths, and to create elegantly minimalist panels whose emotional depth charge comes as an even greater shock. His sparse dialogue, dark wit, and supremely bold use of "jump-cuts" from one scene to the next (sometimes spanning a number of years) make Hey, Wait... a surprising and engaging debut. Love and Rockets co-creator Gilbert Hernandez calls this one of the best graphic novels ever.

On the Camino

On the Camino

The Camino de Santiago is a 500 mile, historic pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain. It is walked by thousands every year, both Christians and non-believers. To mark his 50th birthday, the brilliant Norwegian cartoonist Jason decided that walking the length of the Camino was what he needed to do. On the Camino is Jason’s memoir of that trek — 32 days and 500 miles from St. Jean Pied de Port to Finisterre, observing with the eye of an artist, chronicling both the good (people, conversations) and the bad (blisters, bedbugs). Full of quiet incidents, odd encounters, small triumphs, and the occasional setback, On the Camino is the latest graphic novel by a master cartoonist.

Strange Tales (2009)

Strange Tales (2009)

At long last, the wait is over!! Marvel is proud to present the debut of this hotly anticipated three issue anthology showcasing Marvel’s greatest characters re-imagined by the best and brightest talents working in independent comics today. Don’t miss what’s sure to be one of the most exciting collections of comics short stories ever produced!!! Every issue stars a stunning array of the best, most exciting cartoonists on the planet—showcasing the Marvel Heroes as you’ve never seen them before! Featuring the long-awaited Peter Bagge “Incorrigible Hulk” serialized over all three issues!

If You Steal

If You Steal

Frida Kahlo is a hired killer. Santo, the Mexican wrestling film star, faces his ultimate challenge. The rise and fall of Chet Baker—told in six pages. Night of the Vampire Hunter. The last word on the JFK assassination conspiracies. A non-linear heist story that also somehow includes images by Magritte. A big bug story based on 1950s black-and-white films. And what would Van Morrison’s Moondance album look like if it were a horror comic? All as foretold by Nostradamus, of course. And all told by Jason, whose sly and elusive meanings are hidden beneath a beguilingly deadpan style.

I Killed Adolf Hitler

I Killed Adolf Hitler

An assassin is hired to kill Adolf Hitler and is sent back through time to before WWII. When he arrives, he is unsuccessful and Hitler enters the time machine, coming to the present. Throughout the decades, the assassin has been waiting to finish the job, but he's wondering if hunting Hitler is really how he wants to spend the rest of his life.

Athos in America

Athos in America

A collection of full-color graphic novellas, Athos in America takes its title from the lead story, a prequel of sort to the graphic novel The Last Musketer, in which the seemingly ageless swashbuckler turns up in a bar in 1920 New York and relates the tale of how he went to Hollywood to play himself in a film version of The Three Musketeers. Also included: "The Brain That Wouldn't Virginia Woolf," "Tom Waits on the Moon," and "So Long Mary Ann."